Leeks

Leeks
Onion kin

Leeks' roots are found in ancient Egypt, where archeological sites preserve its image in wall art. Around 1600, Shakespeare mentions the leek in Henry V as an emblem of Wales, which endures to this day. The vegetable, with a milder and more subtle flavor than onion, contains nutrients and antioxidants to help lower cholesterol, fight cancer and promote health of skin, eyes, bones and brain with vitamins A, C and K, folate, beta carotene, lutein, potassium, calcium and iron. Leeks are low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium.

Nutrition Facts
Healthy & Delicious

From savory appetizers to decadent desserts and each course in between, the Foxy-brand line of produce adds healthful nutrients and flavorful ingredients. These recipes offer suggestions for food pairings, hint at the culinary versatility Foxy-brand products provide and help you fill half your plate with vegetables and fruit at every meal, as suggested by U.S. dietary guidelines.

Potato Leek Soup45 min prep

Handling Tips
Layers of flavor

An onion relative, the cylindrical leek has white and green leaf sheaths that form a stalk. Choose firm, crisp stalks; avoid yellow and withered tops. Refrigerate, unwashed, in a plastic bag up to 2 weeks; store away from other foods that might absorb odor. Wash thoroughly before use to remove soil from compact leaves by soaking in cool water. For most recipes, trim and discard a bit of the top-most dark leaves, which may be bitter or woody. The mild, fresh flavor of leeks complements fish dishes, soups and stews, blends well in stir-fry recipes and enlivens salads as a raw ingredient.